• What is tested? 

    The PSSA assessment in reading, math, and writing  is administered to all students in grades 3-8 and 11. The science PSSA is administered in grades 4, 8, and 11.  Currently, the reading and math tests determine the school's Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) status under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.  The PSSA tests are used by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to measure student achievement in schools throughout the state.  The scores are reported as:

    •       Advanced
    •       Proficient
    •       Basic
    •       Below Basic

    One of Pennsylvania's graduation requirements is proficiency in the academic standards, as

    demonstrated by scoring proficient or advanced on the PSSA 11 (in reading or math) or on alternate district

    assessments.  Passing the PSSA is the most efficient way to demonstrate proficiency.

     


    MATH:

    Students will take 72 Multiple choice questions and 4 open ended response items. 

    There are 5 reporting categories for math:

    • Numbers and operations
    • Measurement
    • Geometry
    • Algebra
    • Data Analysis

    READING:

    Students will take 58 Multiple choice questions and 5 open ended response items. 
    There are two major reporting categories:

    • Comprehension and reading skills (Both fiction and nonfiction)
    • Interpretation and analysis of fiction and nonfiction

    WRITING:

    Students will take a multiple choice section with a focus on editing and revising skills as well as respond to two writing prompts (informational and persuasive modes).
    Written responses are scored holistically in the domains of focus, content, organization, and style.  Students receive a separate score for conventions. 

    SCIENCE:

    Students will take 62 multiple choice questions and 11 open ended items.  There are four reporting categories for science:
    • The Nature of Science 
    • Biological Science
    • Physical Science
    • Earth and Space Science
    Click here for the link to the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
Last Modified on January 21, 2010