• 11th GRADE US HISTORY UNIT GUIDE
    MR. BRENNAN
     

    UNIT 1: INDUSTRIALIZATION OF THE UNITED STATES 1865-1914


    BIG IDEA: THE UNITED STATES TRANSFORMATION FROM AGRICULTURE TO INDUSTRY AFFECTED IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES AND MIGRATION WITHIN THE UNITED STATES.


    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • How does technology change the way people live and work?

    • In what positive and negative ways have immigration and urbanization impacted American society?

    • What is the government's role in our daily lives?

     

    THE TRIUMPH OF INDUSTRY (1865-1914): Chapter 4

    entrepreneur

    protective tariff

    laissez faire

    patent

    Thomas Edison

    Bessemer process

    suspension bridge

    timezone

    mass production

    corporation

    monopoly

    cartel

    John D. Rockefeller

    horizontal integration

    trust

    Andrew Carnegie

    vertical integration

    Social Darwinism

    ICC

    Sherman Antitrust Act

    sweatshop

    company town

    collective bargaining

    socialism

    Knights of Labor

    Terence V. Powderly

    Samuel Gompers

    AFL

    Haymarket Riot

    Homestead Strike

    Eugene V. Debs

    Pullman Strike

    IMMIGRATION AND URBANIZATION (1865-1914): Chapter 5

    “new” immigrant

    steerage

    Ellis Island

    Angel Island

    Americanization

    “melting pot”

    nativism

    Chinese Exclusion Act

    urbanization

    rural-to-urban migrant

    skyscraper

    Elisha Otis

    mass transit

    suburb

    Frederick Law Olmsted

    tenement

    Mark Twain

    Gilded Age

    conspicuous consumerism

    mass culture

    Joseph Pulitzer

    William Randolph Hearst

    Horatio Alger

    vaudeville

     

    UNIT 2: EMERGENCE OF THE MODERN UNITED STATES 1890-1920


    BIG IDEA: THE UNITED STATES BEGAN LOOKING OUTWARD, FORMING ITS ROLE AS AN IMPORTANT LEADER AMONG NATIONS OF THE WORLD AND CONTENDING WITH DOMESTIC ISSUES AND GLOBAL CONFLICTS.


    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • What is the role of government in promoting the general welfare of the public?

    • How do individuals and organizations help to create change within society?

    • Why does conflict develop?

    • What role does the United States play in world affairs?

    • What are the significant domestic and foreign consequences of World War I?

    • What is the role of media in shaping public opinion?


    THE PROGRESSIVE ERA (1890-1920): Chapter 8

    Progressivism

    muckraker

    Lincoln Steffens

    Jacob Riis

    Social Gospel

    settlement house

    Jane Addams

    direct primary

    initiative

    referendum

    recall

    Florence Kelley

    NCL

    temperance movement

    Margaret Sanger

    Ida B. Wells

    suffrage

    Carrie Chapman Catt

    NAWSA

    Alice Paul

    Nineteenth Amendment

    Americanization

    Booker T. Washington W.E.B. Du Bois

    Niagara Movement

    NAACP

    Urban League

    Anti-Defamation League

    mutualistas

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Square Deal

    Hepburn Act

    Meat Inspection Act

    Pure Food and Drug Act

    John Muir

    Gifford Pinchot

    National Reclamation Act

    New Nationalism

    Progressive Party

    Woodrow Wilson

    New Freedom

    Sixteenth Amendment

    Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Trade Commision

    Clayton Antitrust Act

     

    AN EMERGING WORLD POWER (1890-1917): Chapter 9

    imperialism

    extractive economy

    Alfred T. Mahan

    Social Darwinism

    Frederick J. Turner

    Matthew Perry

    Queen Liliuokalani

    Jose’ Marti

    William Randolph Hearst

    Yellow Press

    jingoism

    George Dewey

    Emilio Aguinaldo

    Rough Riders

    Treaty of Paris

    insurrection

    guerrilla warfare

    William Howard Taft

    sphere of influence

    John Hay

    Boxer Rebellion

    Open Door Policy

    Russo-Japanese War

    “Gentleman’s Agreement”

    Great White Fleet

    Foraker Act

    Platt Amendment

    “big stick” diplomacy

    Panama Canal

    Roosevelt Corollary

    “dollar diplomacy”

    “moral diplomacy”

    Francisco “Pancho” Villa

       

           

    WORLD WAR I AND BEYOND (1914-1920): Chapter 10

    militarism

    Francis Ferdinand

    William II

    Western Front

    casualty

    contraband

    U-boat

    Lusitania

    Zimmerman Note

    Selective Service Act

    Bernard Baruch

    CPI

    George Creel

    conscientious objector

    Espionage Act

    Great Migration

    convoy

    Fourteen Points

    self-determination

    League of Nations

    Henry Cabot Lodge

    reparations

    “irreconcilables”

    “reservationists”

    influenza

    inflation

    Red Scare

    Palmer Raids

    Nicola Sacco

    Bartolomeo Vanzetti

       
     

    UNIT 3: PROSPERITY AND DEPRESSION 1919-1941


    BIG IDEA: HUMAN SUFFERING AND HARDSHIPS CAN SHAKE THE VERY FOUNDATIONS OF A SOCIETY.


    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • How do new ideas change the way people live?

    • How does technology change the way people live?

    • How do economic conditions affect everyday life?

    • To what degree should government actively involve itself in society?


    THE TWENTIES (1919-1929): Chapter 11

    Henry Ford

    mass production

    assembly line

    consumer revolution

    installment buying

    bull market

    buying on margin

    Teapot Dome scandal

    Washington Naval   

      Disarmament Conference

    Kellogg-Briand Pact

    Dawes Plan

    modernism

    fundamentalism

    Scopes Trial

    quota system

    Ku Klux Klan

    Prohibition

    Eighteenth Amendment

    Volstead Act

    bootlegger

    Charlie Chaplin

    The Jazz Singer

    flapper

    Sigmund Freud

    “Lost Generation”

    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Ernest Hemingway

    Marcus Garvey

    jazz

    Louis Armstrong

    Bessie Smith

    Harlem Renaissance

    Claude McKay

    Langston Hughes

    Zora Neale Hurston

     

    THE GREAT DEPRESSION (1928-1932): Chapter 12

    Herbert Hoover

    speculation

    Black Tuesday

    business cycle

    Great Depression

    Hawley-Smoot Tariff

    breadline

    Hooverville

    tenant farmer

    Dust Bowl

    Okies

    repatriation

    localism

    RFC

    Hoover Dam

    Bonus Army


    THE NEW DEAL (1932-1941): Chapter 13


    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Eleanor Roosevelt

    New Deal

    fireside chat

    FDIC

    Charles Coughlin

    Huey Long

    WPA

    Social Security Act

    Wagner Act

    Fair Labor Standards Act

    sit-down strikes

    collective bargaining

    Black Cabinet

    Mary McLeod Bethune

    Indian New Deal

    New Deal coalition

    welfare state

    Federal Art Project

    John Steinbeck

    The Wizard of Oz

    War of the Worlds

       
     
     

    UNIT 4: WORLD WAR II AND POSTWAR AMERICA 1931-1960


    BIG IDEA: WAR CAN LEAD TO DRAMATIC SOCIAL CHANGES. DIVERSITY AMONG WORLD SOCIETIES CONTRIBUTES TO TENSIONS BETWEEN NATIONAL INTERESTS AND GLOBAL PRIORITIES.

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • Why does conflict develop?

    • What sacrifices does war require?

    • How did the use of the atomic bomb impact American domestic and foreign policy?

    • When does the common good outweigh the rights of the individual?


    THE COMING OF WAR (1931-1942): Chapter 14

     

    totalitarianism

    Joseph Stalin

    Benito Mussolini

    Adolf Hitler

    anti-Semitic

    Spanish Civil War

    appeasement

    Munich Pact

    blitzkrieg

    Axis Powers

    Winston Churchill

    Lend-Lease Act

    Allies

    Pearl Harbor

    Bataan Death March


    WORLD WAR II (1941-1945): Chapter 15


    blitzkrieg

    Winston Churchill

    totalitarianism

    Adolf Hitler

    Douglas MacArthur

        Manhattan Project

    Tuskegee Airmen

    rationing

    internment

    genocide

    island hopping

    Bataan Death March


    THE COLD WAR (1945-1960): Chapter 16


    satellite states

    Cold War

    Truman Doctrine

    containment

    Marshall Plan

    Berlin airlift

    NATO

    Warsaw Pact

    Arms Race

    McCarthyism

    Red Scare

    communism

    Iron Curtain

    Mao Zedong

    Douglas MacArthur

    “limited war”

    SEATO

    Levittown

    consumerism

    38th parallel

    POSTWAR CONFIDENCE AND ANXIETY (1945-1960): Chapter 17
     

    demobilization

    Baby Boom

    GI Bill

    Taft-Hatrley Act

    Sunbelt

    Interstate Highway Act

    AFL-CIO

    franchise business

    Elvis Presley

    rock-and-roll

    nuclear family

     
    UNIT 5: CHALLENGES AND CHANCE 1945-1980

    BIG IDEA: ACHIEVING THE AMERICAN DREAM IS REALITY FOR SOME, A CHALLENGE FOR OTHERS.


    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • What motivates people to act?

    • How does change in leadership impact society?

    • What makes a great leader?


    THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (1945-1975): Chapter 18

     

    Brown v. Board of Education

    de jure segregation

    de facto segregation

    Freedom Riders

    Earl Warren

    March on Washington

    Rosa Parks

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Montgomery bus boycott

    Thurgood Marshall

    Letter from Birmingham Jail

    THE KENNEDY AND JOHNSON YEARS (1960-1968): Chapter 19


    Fidel Castro

    Civil Rights Act

    Warren Commission

    Berlin Wall

    Medicare

    Great Society

    deficit spending

    Richard M. Nixon

    Medicaid

    Lyndon B. Johnson


    THE VIETNAM WAR ERA (1954-1975): Chapter 20


    Geneva Accords

    Ngo Dinh Diem

    Ho Chi Minh Trail

    Buddhists monks vs. Diem

    ARVN (Army of the Republic of Viet Nam)

    Napalm

    Agent Orange

    Media and Credibility

    The Draft and Deferments

    SDS/Campus Protests

    TET Offensive

    1968 Chicago Democratic Convention

    Nixon Doctrine

    Peace with Honor

    Cambodian Invasion

    Kent State Shooting

    Pentagon Papers

    Fall of Saigon

    POWs and MIAs

    War Powers Act


    AN ERA OF PROTEST AND CHANGE (1960-1980): Chapter 21


    counterculture

    generation gap

    Beatles

    feminism

    ERA

    Clean Air Act

    Clean Water Act

    Cesar Chavez

    migrant farmworker

    AIM

    Ralph Nader

    Rachel Carson

    Earth Day


    A CRISIS IN CONFIDENCE (1968-1980): Chapter 22

     

    silent majority

    OPEC

    southern strategy

    Watergate

    executive privilege

    Twenty-fifth Amendment

    Gerald Ford

    Pardon

    Jimmy Carter

    amnesty

    Camp David Accords

    Ayatollah Khomeini 

     

    UNIT 6: CHANGING AND ENDURING ISSUES


    BIG IDEA: THE PASSAGE OF TIME AFFECTS THE WAY EVENTS ARE UNDERSTOOD

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

    • What previous events in American history have forced the nation to dramatically change its policy and actions?

    • How does governmental power reflect and shape society?


    THE CONSERVATIVE RESURGENCE (1980-1993): Chapter 23

     

    liberal

    conservative

    Moral Majority

    Ronald Reagan

    AIDS

    Savings and Loan Crisis

    budget deficit

    national debt

    Saddam Hussein

    Contras

    Strategic Defense Initiative

    Contras

    Mikhail Gorbachev

    Iran-Contra affair

    Tiananmen Square

    apartheid

    Nelson Mandela

    Operation Desert Storm

     

    INTO A NEW CENTURY (1992-Today): Chapter 24

     

    personal computer

    satellite

    internet

    globalization

    William Jefferson Clinton

    Brady Bill

    impeachment

    Dept. of Homeland Security

    WMD

    WTO

    ethnic cleansing

    NAFTA

    George W. Bush

    No Child Left Behind Act

    Taliban

    Patriot Act

    Barack Obama

    Tea Party Movement

     

Last Modified on March 15, 2019